On Letting Go

Moving to another country helped me come to a huge realization: my life is cluttered with things. I didn’t even realize how much I owned until I had to sit down and pick through my entire life, deciding what stays and what goes.

Earlier this year, I decided to take on living life with less. And I did cut down on my consumption. I even went through clothing and some of my belongings, but there were a lot of things I did not want to part with at the time, and even more things that I didn’t even consider to be cluttering my life, like kitchenwares and the old prom dresses shoved in the back of my closet. But when I had to really go through everything to clean out my apartment, I realized just how much I had overlooked in my quest to downsize my life.

Some items were easy to get rid of. I donated a lot of clothing and packed up boxes of possessions that I didn’t feel served me in my life. With others I had a harder time.

In moving to another country, the most difficult things I have had to part with were sentimental pieces that I had accumulated throughout the years from family, friends, and traveling. While there are a few things I have decided to hold on to, most of these possessions have found new homes. I couldn’t simply take these possessions to the Salvation Army or Goodwill. Instead, I took time to think about each piece: where it came from, who gave it to me, the stories and memories associated with it, and who those stories would resonate with. When I felt particularly moved by the thought of a specific object going to a certain person, I decided that would be who I gave it to. In every encounter of passing on a possession to a new person, the person was grateful, and often moved by the sentiment behind the object. Each time, I knew I made the right choice. This passing on of my possessions made it a lot easier to let go.

With each item I purged from my life, I felt lighter. I didn’t realize how much these possessions were weighing me down until I had to consider their meaning, their use, and whether or not it would serve me as I move on from my life back home. I don’t know that I will ever accumulate so many possessions again. Now that I am living a more simple life, I feel like my life is more in line with what I really value– meaningful relationships, experiences, being an active participant in my life, rather than a passive one. So even though letting go has been difficult, the positive benefits of truly minimizing my life have been far greater than any sadness I have felt in getting rid of everything I have accumulated. Because at the end of the day, the whole of my possessions does not represent how well I lived my life. Rather my stories, experiences, memories, and the people I have shared them with are the true measure of a well-lived life.

 

Feature image from: http://borntotalkradioshow.com/2017/05/word-day-simplify/

Why We Should All Live With Less

tumblr_static_tumblr_static__640Getting ready to move has been hard. Not because of saying my goodbyes, not because of leaving a job I love, but because of getting rid of all of my possessions. And I don’t mean the ones I have sentimental attachments to. No, I mean the ones that I put little thought toward, the ones that clutter up the back of my closet, linger under my bathroom sink, and crowd the drawers I don’t go into.

Now that the time has really come for me to part with my possessions, I’m losing my mind. When did I get all of this stuff? And how did I not realize I had so much when I moved out of my college dorm room or into my first apartment? When I was unpacking it all? It’s really been blowing my mind just how much I own, and how little of it I actually used.

simplifyPerhaps one of the most jarring realizations I had was that I accumulated so much of the same stuff. Why did I need fifteen coffee mugs? In reality, I only need one. I can only use one at a time. Maybe two, in case I have a friend over and they also want a cup of coffee or tea, but anything more than that just seems excessive, especially after determining what to do with them all.

Another area that I was guilty of hoarding was old clothing. And I mean the clothing I will never wear again, like dresses from the various proms I attended and weddings I was in. Not only will I never fit into those dresses again, but I’ll also never have a reason to wear them again, so why was I hanging onto them? There are so many young girls out there who hope and pray for a beautiful prom dress, but cannot afford it, so why not donate them? They aren’t doing anyone any good by hanging in the back of my closet.

Hopefully, these experiences have made you consider what areas of your life are cluttered by possessions you feel the need to hang onto or have just pushed from your mind. Living with less seems like a huge commitment, and to some, it sounds downright crazy. But in reality, our lives should be a collection of our experiences, not our things.

So start small. Tackle cleaning out under the bathroom sink. Downsize from twenty coffee mugs to two. Donate those old dresses, coats, scarves, hats, and blankets you no longer use. Get rid of the old memorabilia from high school, because let’s face it, no one cares if you have a varsity letter for whatever sport it is you played. Go through your old t-shirts. If you can’t part with them, give them new life and have them turned into a t-shirt blanket, and make that blanket one of the only ones you own. In time, you’ll notice you feel lighter. Your space will no longer feel chaotic and cluttered. When your physical environment is in order, it’s amazing how much emotional order you’ll feel, too.